This page was last edited on 3 March 2020, at 03:48 (UTC).

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A Wizard of Earthsea is a fantasy novel written by American author Ursula K. Le Guin (pictured). First published by the small press Parnassus in 1968, it is considered a classic of fantasy and of children's literature. Set in the fictional archipelago of Earthsea, the story centers around a gifted mage named Ged. His prickly nature drives him into a duel with an older pupil at a school of wizardry, during which his spell goes awry and releases a shadow creature that attacks him. The novel follows his journey to be free of the creature. Often described as a coming-of-age story, the book explores Ged's process of learning to cope with power and come to terms with death. Taoist themes are reflected in a fundamental balance in the universe of Earthsea, which wizards are supposed to maintain. Margaret Atwood called the novel one of the "wellsprings" of fantasy literature. It was followed by five other volumes sharing a setting; the six works are collectively known as the Earthsea Cycle. A Wizard of Earthsea received highly positive reviews, initially as a work for children and later among a general audience as well. It won the Boston Globe–Horn Book Award in 1969 and was one of the final recipients of the Lewis Carroll Shelf Award in 1979. Margaret Atwood called it one of the "wellsprings" of fantasy literature.[3] Le Guin wrote five subsequent books that are collectively referred to as the Earthsea Cycle, together with A Wizard of Earthsea: The Tombs of Atuan (1971), The Farthest Shore (1972), Tehanu (1990), and The Other Wind (2001).

In the news

on this day

  • March 5: St Piran's Day (Christianity) in Cornwall, England; Learn from Lei Feng Day in China

  • The Bloody Massacre, engraved by Paul Revere

  • 1496 – King Henry VII of England issued letters patent to John Cabot and his sons, authorising them to explore undiscovered lands.

  • 1770 – American Revolution: British soldiers fired into a crowd (engraving shown) in Boston, killing five people.

  • 1825 – Roberto Cofresí, one of the last successful Caribbean pirates, was apprehended after his flagship sloop Anne was captured by authorities.

  • 1960 – Cuban photographer Alberto Korda took his iconic photograph Guerrillero Heroico of Marxist revolutionary Che Guevara.

  • Hermann Balk (d. 1239) · Michael von Faulhaber (b. 1869) · Elaine Paige (b. 1948)

  • The Bloody Massacre, engraved by Paul Revere

  • 1496 – King Henry VII of England issued letters patent to John Cabot and his sons, authorising them to explore undiscovered lands.

did you know...

photo of the day

A dik-dik is the name for any of four species of small antelope in the genus Madoqua that live in the bushlands of eastern and southern Africa. Dik-diks stand about 30–40 centimetres (12–15.5 in) at the shoulder, are 50–70 cm (19.5–27.5 in) long, weigh 3–6 kilograms (6.6–13.2 lb) and can live for up to 10 years. Dik-diks are named for the alarm calls of the females. In addition to the females' alarm call, both the male and female make a shrill, whistling sound. These calls may alert other animals to predators.

This page was last edited on 3 March 2020, at 03:48 (UTC).

Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization.

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